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M. D. Anderson to Launch Nutrition Study for African-American Women; Study to Determine if Diet Can Reduce Risk of Breast Cancer

M. D. Anderson to Launch Nutrition Study for African-American Women; Study to Determine if Diet Can Reduce Risk of Breast Cancer
M. D. Anderson News Release 08/06/03

News Conference: 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 6
Family Café
2712 Blodgett

The Center for Research on Minority Health of The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center is launching a study to determine if there is a link between nutrition and breast cancer risk in African-American women.

Known as the African-American Nutrition for Life Project or A Nu-Life, the four-year study will follow 200 Houston-area women between the ages of 25 and 45 to determine if diet impacts estrogen levels.  According to Dr. Lovell Jones, principal investigator for the study, there is evidence that a high-fiber, low-fat diet can reduce estrogen levels in women, and studies have shown that women with lower estrogen levels have a lower risk of breast cancer.

Premenopausal women who participate in the study will attend nutrition classes for one year, receive free mammography (for age-appropriate women) and gynecologic exams (if desired) and complete a series of questionnaires and surveys related to diet and exercise. 

To recognize the launch of the study, Family Café will offer lunchtime customers three low-fat entrees, side dishes and a dessert to show that longtime favorite foods – fixed in a healthy way -- also can taste great.  There will be sign-up and information tables available at Family Café during the noon hour as well as free screenings for diabetes, cholesterol and high blood pressure. 

A Nu-Life is funded by the American Cancer Society.

According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 20,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to occur in African-American women in 2003; breast cancer is the most common cancer among African-American women.  The breast cancer death rate is higher among African-American women than white women despite a lower incidence rate.  An estimated 5,700 deaths from breast cancer are expected to occur among African-American women in 2003.

08/06/2003


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