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Drug Protects Lungs From Aggressive Chemoradiation in Patients with Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer 

Drug Protects Lungs From Aggressive Chemoradiation in Patients with Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer 
Results from the 43rd Annual
American Society for Therapeutic Radiology & Oncology (ASTRO),November 2001
M. D. Anderson News Release 11/28/01

Researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have demonstrated that the drug amifostine significantly protects the lungs from effects of combined radiation and chemotherapy, currently the most aggressive and effective treatment for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer.

The Phase III study evaluated lung function before and after radiation therapy in 62 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, who were treated on a prospective randomized protocol between 1998 and 2000 with combinations of radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

"Our study shows that adding amifostine can preserve pulmonary function and reduce severe esophagitis and neutropenic fever significantly during this powerful and highly toxic treatment," said Dr. Ritsuko Komaki, the lead investigator of the study and professor of radiation oncology at M. D. Anderson. "Concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy is the most aggressive and effective treatment for this ominous cancer, but the major problems were the side effects. This study shows we can treat patients without causing significant toxicities."

11/28/01


© 2014 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center