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BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

The route a cancer takes from its earliest stages to advanced disease is a long and winding road. Often, the first mutations or changes that send a normal cell on the path toward cancer occur decades before any diagnosis could be made.

Fortunately, our immune systems are able to recognize and eliminate most of these “pre-cancers” before we ever know they existed. However, some pre-cancers can evade detection, enabling them...

Eduardo Vilar-Sanchez, M.D., Ph.D., co-director of the Pre-Cancer Atlas project

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

First discovered in the 1980s, exosomes are microscopic spherical packages, called vesicles, released by all cells. Their normal role in the...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Adoptive cellular therapy is a form of immunotherapy that uses cells from our immune systems, such as T cells, as a treatment for cancer....

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Stomach and esophageal cancers are diagnosed in more than 40,000 people each year in the U.S. Most of these cases aren’t detected until the cancers are advanced. Unfortunately, available treatment options are not as effective once a cancer becomes metastatic.

Most patients with metastatic stomach or esophageal cancer are treated with combination chemotherapy, but their outcomes can vary widely.

“We select combinations based...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Discovering and developing new treatments for cancer is a difficult process with many obstacles. These challenges can slow the process of...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Targeted therapies are designed to work against specific vulnerabilities in a cancer cell.

The targeted therapy drug venetoclax is...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

For patients with pancreatic cancer, the benefits from immunotherapy treatments with immune checkpoint inhibitors or cell therapies have been...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Last updated on August 18, 2021

Immunotherapy is a treatment option for a growing number of cancers. Unlike traditional treatments...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Minimal residual disease (MRD) is a term commonly used with blood cancers that describes a small fraction of cancer cells that remain or come...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Layered on top of our genes is an additional set of information -- the epigenome, which is important for many cellular activities. Disruption...