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Online CME

Interpersonal Communication And Relationship Enhancement: I*CARE

The I*CARE program provides online education designed to improve communication among cancer patients, their families and their clinical team.  Although these materials are directed toward improving the communication skills of oncologists, other health care professionals will find the material relevant.

These continuing medical education programs provide information on the how-to's of patient-doctor communication (breaking bad news, non-verbal communication skills, discussing cancer recurrence, medical errors, end of life and more).

Basic Strategies

In this course, you'll learn about four useful communication strategies: CLASS, SPIKES, EVE and CONES.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 2.00  AMA PRA Category 1 Credits TM in the area of medical ethics and/or professional responsibility

Non-Verbal Communication

Dr. Robert Buckman discusses techniques for effectively using non-verbal communication. You will find how paying attention to non-verbal behavior in the clinical encounter can help you with the messages that you send to others.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility

Managing Difficult Communication

  • Difficult Communication Module 1 - Mr. Carter - Disbelief/Denial: In the following interactions with Mr. Carter, you will get to follow him throughout the course of his illness by way of observing the interaction between him and his oncologist at four stages of his disease: at his initial diagnosis, at a well-patient follow-up, at a point of disease recurrence and transition to palliative care, and at the end of life. This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility
  • Difficult Communication Module 2 - Mrs. Anderson - Clinical Trial/Recurrence/End of Life: Mrs. Anderson has been referred to a medical oncologist without much explanation for the reason. She is a candidate for a clinical trial comparing three different adjuvant therapy regimens. Here the doctor is seen discussing the clinical trial and then later in her illness dealing with recurrence and end of life issues. This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility.
  • Difficult Communication Module 3 - Mrs. Wright - Serious Illness/Sensitive Discussions: When we first meet her, Mrs. Wright has been diagnosed with colon cancer, and has had her initial surgery. She arrives at the oncologist's office two weeks after her surgery, unaware of the seriousness of her disease, and unaware that she will require further treatment. View how the oncologist handles this and other sensitive communication during the course of her illness. This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility
  • Difficult Communication Module 4 - Crossroads: This module will show you a patient/physician interaction in which several choice points occur. These are points at which the content is emotionally laden and where the type of response the physician chooses can change the course of the interview and the quality of the interaction. This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility.
  • Difficult Communication Module 5 - An Error has Occurred, I'm Going To Mexico, My Mother is Not to be Told, Don't Give Up on My Mother: Here you will see four videos dealing with difficult communication: The physician must inform the patient's son that she received the wrong dose of chemotherapy; the patient states she will seek alternative therapy; the patient's son says his mother is not to be told that she has cancer; the son will be translating for the doctor; and the patient's son is concerned that his mother's treatment plan has become palliative rather than curative. This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility
  • Difficult Communication Module 6 - Your Father Has Died, I Will Not Take Tamoxifen, Discontinuing Ventilation, Euthanasia: In these four videos you will see: The patient's daughter is informed that her father has died unexpectedly. The physician hasn't met the daughter and isn't the patient's physician; Mrs. Adler is a good candidate for tamoxifen, but says she will not take it; the physician must tell Mr. Eden's family that continued mechanical life support is no longer appropriate; and the patient makes a direct request for information about euthanasia. This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility
  • Difficult Communication Module 7 - How Much Time Have I Got, Patient Is Angry, Telephone Conversations: These three videos show: Mr. Kerr has been recently diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the lung and wants to know if he should go ahead with the purchase of a condo; the patient is angry because he found the Barium Enema uncomfortable and degrading; and three different types of conversations in which information about an abnormality is communicated over the telephone. This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility
  • Difficult Communication Module 8 - Genetic Counseling: Genetic counseling is a topic of major interest to many patients who want to know if they're at increased risk. Here's an example of how a practitioner can assess the need and make a referral for genetic testing. The patient is then interviewed by a genetic counselor and you can watch the disclosure of both positive and negative test results. This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility.
  • I*CARE Achieving Communication Excellence - These lectures are presented by national and international communication skills experts who participated in our I*CARE Achieving Communication Excellence (ACE) lecture series. They may be taken together or separately. Each module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility.
  • On Being An Oncologist - The following is a reflection on the challenges of treating a life-threatening illness such as cancer brought home by actors William Hurt and Megan Cole. This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 3.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits TM in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility.

Professional Oncology Education

Professional Oncology Education initiatives are designed for health care practitioners and feature lectures, courses, and case studies provided by MD Anderson’s experts on key areas of professional education, prevention, patient care and survivorship. The following courses have been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits TM:

Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Course

The goal of the “Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome Course” is to help healthcare professionals understand the causes of HBOC, the chances of inheriting it, the importance of diagnosing it, how to diagnose it, how to manage it, and ethical legal issues and psychosocial issues related to it. A core component of this course includes advice on gathering family histories. Additional lectures discuss fertility and pregnancy issues.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 4.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ in the area of medical ethics and/or professional responsibility.

Survivorship - Introductory Lectures

Dr. Bevers defines second primary cancer, reviews their incidence, and outlines three common carcinogenic pathways for the development of a second primary cancer. She also discusses ways to reduce the risk of developing second primary cancers and how to best screen for them.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ .

Bone Health in Cancer Survivors

The incidence of fractures from osteoporosis is larger than the incidence of heart attacks, strokes, and breast cancer – combined. It's estimated that 35 million American women will have either osteoporosis or low bone mass at some point in their lives. Certain conditions, including cancer and its treatments, can make bones fragile and more likely to break. The lecture focuses on bone health in breast and prostate cancer survivors.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ .

Breast Cancer Survivorship

Today, there are 13.7 million cancer survivors in the United States. By 2022, the number of cancer survivors is expected to surge by a third, to 18 million people. The National Cancer Institute believes that doctors will not be prepared to deal with the problems cancer survivors face. A multidisciplinary team of oncologists, surgeons, radiologists, advanced practice nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center provide a course for health care professionals on current practices and the latest guidelines for the management and surveillance of cancer survivors.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 7.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ .

Colorectal Cancer Survivorship

Today, there are more than 1 million colorectal cancer survivors in the United States, 600,000-700,000 of whom have no current signs of cancer. The Colorectal Cancer Survivorship course provides the most up-to-date practice advice to assist physicians and other health care professionals in evaluating and managing colorectal cancer survivors. The course is taught by a multidisciplinary faculty team at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center that cares for colorectal cancer patients and survivors.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 3.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ .

Cancer Survivorship 1 Course

The "Cancer Survivorship 1" course series defines cancer survivorship and introduces models of multidisciplinary survivorship care. The lectures in this course discuss complications from late effects of treatment; appropriate screening for tumor recurrence, second tumors, and co-morbid conditions; management strategies for cancer-related fatigue; common fertility issues; psychosocial side effects of cancer treatment and resources for optimistic coping; appropriate follow-up treatment; and guidelines and recommendations for the assessment and management of long-term complications of breast cancer, such as lymphedema.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 5.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™

Tobacco Cessation Course

The course provides an overview of the nature of tobacco dependence and the need for treatment, the biology of nicotine dependence, the effective behavioral treatments for nicotine dependence, the available pharmacologic treatments for tobacco dependence including prescription medications, and the combination of behavioral treatments and medication to enhance treatment outcomes.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™

Introduction to Clinical Oncology Course

The course covers cancer prevention and risk assessment, diagnosis and screening of hematological and solid tumors, and various treatment modalities, including surgery, radiation therapy, and drug treatment. Additional lectures are provided on oncologic emergencies, symptom management, palliative care, and survivorship care.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 10.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. The Palliative Care Lecture, Parts I, II and III, has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility.

Fluoroscopic and X-Ray Safety Training

The Fluoroscopic and X-Ray Safety Advanced Training Program for physicians provides training to safely perform fluoroscopy procedures in the State of Texas.  This activity is intended for physicians who frequently use fluoroscopy or perform complex fluoroscopically guided procedures. Other medical professionals involved in fluoroscopic procedures may also wish to take this course to expand and deepen their knowledge. This course teaches all of the subjects included in the Basic Training Program, as well as advanced fluoroscopic physics, advanced techniques for dose reduction, and special patient considerations.

This module has been designated by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center for 8.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.


The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has implemented a process whereby everyone who is in a position to control the content of an educational activity must disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest that could potentially affect the information presented. MD Anderson also requires that all faculty disclose any unlabeled use or investigational use (not yet approved for any purpose) of pharmaceutical and medical device products. Specific disclosure will be made to the participants prior to the educational activity.

Copyright © 2012 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. All rights reserved. No part of this work can be reproduced, distributed, or otherwise used without the express permission from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

All statements and opinions contained herein are solely those of the individual speakers and may not reflect those of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.


© 2014 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center