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Master of Science in Diagnostic Genetics

The Graduate Program in Diagnostic Genetics concentrates on the mastery of interpretive skills in major areas of the field including:
  • Pre and Post-natal genetic disorder testing
  • Cancer genetics testing
  • Infectious disease testing
  • DNA forensic science testing
  • Prokaryotic and eukaryotic Genomics
  • Molecular evolution and Bioinformatics

The program is administered by:

Dean: Shirley Richmond, Ed.D.
Program Director: Peter Hu, Ph.D., MLS(ASCP)CM CGCM, MBCM
Education Coordinator (Molecular Genetics): Awdhesh Kalia, Ph.D.
Education Coordinator (Cytogenetic Technology): Jun Gu, MD.Ph.D., CG(ASCP)CM

Roster of Faculty

Participating
Faculty
Degree and
School
Clinical
Certification
Teaching
Assignments
Peter Hu
Associate Professor
pchu@mdanderson.org
Ph.D., TUI University Postgraduate: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • MLS(ASCP)
  • CG(ASCP)
  • MB(ASCP)
  • CLSp(MB)
    CLSp(CG)
  • Medical Genetics
  • Cytogenetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Statistics
  • Management in Healthcare
  • Student Research Projects
  • Thesis Advisor
Awdhesh Kalia
Assistant Professor
akalia@
mdanderson.org
PhD., All India Institute of  Medical Sciences
Postdoc: Yale University, CT
Washington University in St. Louis, MO
 
  • Bioinformatics
  • Genomics
  • Molecular Microbiology
  • Student Research Projects
  • Thesis Advisor
Jun Gu
Assistant Professor
jungu@
mdanderson.org
Ph.D., TUI University
  • CLSp(CG)
  • Medical Genetics
  • Cytogenetics
  • Thesis Advisor
Raiyalakshmi Luthra
Professor
rluthra@
mdanderson.org
Ph.D., University of Arizona
Postdoc: University of Arizona, AZ
 
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Thesis Advisor
Ruth Ann Luna
Instructor
raluna@bcm.edu
Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University
  • CLSp(MB)
  • Clinical preceptor
  • Student Research
  • Thesis Advisor
Jing Wang
Assistant Professor
Jwang7@bcm.edu
M.D., Sun Yat-Sen University of Medical Sciences, China
Postdoc: Baylor College of Medicine, TX
  • FACMG
  • Clinical Preceptor
  • Student Research
  • Thesis Advisor
Daniel Penny
Professor
djpenny@
texaschildrens.org
M.D., University of London, England
Postdoc: National University of Ireland
  • MB(ASCP)
  • BCh
  • BAO
  • FRACP
  • FCSANZ
  • Clinical Preceptor
  • Student Research
  • Thesis Advisor
Yuxin Fan
Assistant Professor
yuxinf@bcm.edu
Ph.D., Fudan University, China
Postdoc: University of Washington, WA
  • FACMG
  • Clinical Preceptor
  • Student Research
  • Thesis Advisor
Jianli Dong
Associate Professor
jidong@utmb.edu
M.D., Ph.D., University of Toronto
Postdoc: Yale University School of Medicine, CT
  • FACMG
  • Clinical Preceptor
  • Student Research
  • Thesis Advisor
Marilyn Li
Professor
mmli@bcm.edu
M.D., Tongli Medical College, China
Fellowship: Pennsylvania Medical School, PA
 
  • Clinical Preceptor
  • Student Research
  • Thesis Advisor
Yue Wang
Assistant Professor
ywang@
geneticstesting.com
Ph.D., Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Postdoc: Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY
  • FACMG
  • Clinical Preceptor
  • Student Research
  • Thesis Advisor
Charles E. Stager
Associate Professor
Cstager@bcm.edu
Ph.D., The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Galveston
Postdoc: Baylor College of Medicine, TX
 
  • Clinical Preceptor
  • Molecular Infectious Disease
  • Thesis Advisor
Denise Juroske
Instructor
dmjurosk@
mdanderson.org
MS, Oklahoma State University
Postgraduate: MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX
  • MB(ASCP)
  • CLSp(NCA)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Diagnostic Molecular Genetics
  • Forensics
  • Critical Thinking
Erika Thompson
Co-Director
ejthomps@
mdanderson.org
M.S., Florida International University 
  • Genomics
  • Under-
    graduate Research
  • Clinical Preceptor
Sri Rajagopalan
Assistant Director
srajagopalan@
medcenterlabs.com
Ph.D., Cancer Research Institute Bombay University
  • MP(ASCP)
  • Molecular Genetics
  • Tumor Markers
Xiang-Yang Han
Associate Professor
xhan@
mdanderson.org
M.D., Shanghai Medical University
Ph.D., Ohio State University
Postdoc: Ohio State University, OH
 
  • Molecular Microbiology
Mary Coolbaugh-Murphy
Adjunct Lecturer
toddnmary@
gmail.com
Ph.D., The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
Postdoc: MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX
 
  • Molecular Biology
  • Medical Genetics
  • Laboratory Math
  • Statistics
Brandy Greenhill
Assistant Professor
bgreenhill@
mdanderson.org
Dr.PH, The University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston
  • MLS(ASCP)
  • Nucleic Acid Testing in Immuno-hematology Laboratory

 

Mission

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Master's Program in Diagnostic Genetics, in concert with the mission and vision of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, is committed to the education of technically and academically outstanding graduates prepared to meet the immediate and future needs of molecular diagnostic laboratories and allied health teaching.

Objectives

The Human Genome Project continues to identify the role of an increasing number of genes as playing a significant role in human disease. As a result, a MS degree in the related field of Diagnostic Genetics offers a wide range of career options, including leadership roles in:

  • Diagnostic labs within a hospital setting
  • Pharmaceutical industry including R&D and sales
  • Biotechnology companies, R&D and sales
  • Research, laboratories, including Lab manager and research associate positions
  • Teaching institutions: including Instructor/Faculty positions

Selection Process

Admission is dependent on factors that include:

  • Cumulative GPA
  • Science and Math GPA
  • GRE (must include analytical section score) or current clinical certification through the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) in one of the following MB, CG, or MLS, unless waiver approved by admissions committee
  • Applicant's personal qualities such as maturity, ethical integrity, ability to handle stressful situations, and the applicant's long-term professional goals.
  • Reference letters
  • Assessment scores (taken on the date of the interview)
  • Ability to meet the SHP non-academic technical standards
  • Race, religion, national origin, veteran status, gender, or disability are not factors considered in the selection process

Applicants should begin the application process three to six months prior to the application deadline to ensure all documents are received and processed by the UTHSC-Houston Registrar's office. 

Nonacademic Requirements

For a description of the non-academic technical standards requirements for admission, visit the admission section of the SHP Catalog.

Admission to the graduate program is highly competitive. The program may accept 6-8 qualified students from among the applicant pool in any given academic year. Applicants are encouraged to begin the application process three to nine months prior to the application deadline to ensure all documents are received and processed by the UTHSC-Houston Registrar's office.

Program Admission Requirements

The Master of Science degree is a full-time two-year program with entry at the post-baccalaureate level. 
The School of Health Professions is served by the Office of the Registrar for the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHSCH).

 Application Deadline: May 31   
To apply, visit the application page  within the UTHSCH web site, and select " Graduate MDA" in the School category to apply to this program. 
Please contact the SHP MS in Diagnostic Genetics Program Director, Dr.Peter Hu, for more information and to communicate your interest in applying for this program.

Applicants to the Program in Diagnostic Genetics must satisfy the following requirements for admission:

  • Bachelor degree in biological sciences, biochemistry, chemistry, or related majors with emphasis on genetics/biochemistry courses..
  • All prerequisite course work must be from a regionally accredited college or university. Physical education and military science courses are not acceptable for prerequisite credit.
  • Minimum grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is required to be considered for admission. GPA may be evaluated by the following: overall, science and mathematics course work, and last 60 hours or combinations of all of the above. Special circumstances may be considered, but at the discretion of the Admissions Committee.
  • Applicants holding current Clinical Certification through the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) in MB, CG, or MLS are exempt from taking the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Proof of ASCP Certification should be submitted in order to claim this exemption from taking the GRE.
  • Applicants without ASCP Clinical Certification in the above fields must take the General Test of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) that includes the analytical portion. NOTE: The GRE Designated Institution Code for the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is  0490
  • Applicants with previous graduate degrees, e.g. PhD or MS, may request a waiver of the GRE at the discretion of the Admission’s Committee.
  • Three reference letters from individuals who are in a position to evaluate the applicant's personal attributes and their academic and laboratory skills.
  • Personal interview
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) - Applicants from countries where English is not the native language may be required to take the TOEFL. Internet-based TOEFL is now available and a total test score ranging from 74-78 with a minimum score of 18 in each section is required.

Prior Course work and Experience

The following courses are strongly recommended:

  • Prior Undergraduate or graduate course work in:
    • Molecular Biology
    • Biology
    • Genetics
    • Microbiology
    • Chemistry/ Organic Chemistry
    • Basic Research Techniques
    • Human Physiology
    • Evolutionary Biology
  • Prior research experience during undergraduate study

To apply, visit the application page  within the UTHSCH web site, and select " Graduate MDA" in the School category to apply to this program. 

Submit all Documents by the Following Priority Application Deadline
Applicants are highly encouraged to submit the application and all supporting documents by the priority application deadline.   Applications received after the priority date will be considered for admissions only if space is available.

  • September 15 - Applications Open
  • May 31 - Priority Application Deadline for Diagnostic Genetics
  • August  - 1Closing Date for all Applications

Graduation

Each candidate for a Master's degree must complete:

  • A minimum of 46 semester credit hours of course work
  • Presentation of a poster at a local, state, or national conference
  • The successful defense of a written applied research project

Upon graduation, students are eligible to take the national certification exam in either molecular biology or cytogenetics given by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) depending upon the curriculum track for which the student is seeking certification. (Once the student is admitted to the program, the Program Director will meet with the student to discuss the certification eligibility routes.) In some instances, students may be eligible for dual certification.

Curriculum

An integral part of the MS curriculum is pursuing applied (clinical and basic translational) research. Students are required to select and identify their program mentors and related research laboratories during the first semester of the program. The curriculum includes didactic course work followed by directed clinical training at affiliated hospitals and laboratories. For further details about the curriculum, please refer to the Course work section below, or contact Program Director, Dr. Peter Hu at pchu@mdanderson.org

Affiliations for Clinical Rotation

During the clinical phase of instruction, training and supervision are provided in affiliated clinical laboratories, including:

  • UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (Diagnostic Molecular Imaging Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (HLA Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (DNA Analysis Core Facility), Houston, TX
  • UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (Array-CGH Center), Houston, TX
  • Baylor College of Medicine (Diagnostic Sequencing Laboratory), Houston
  • Baylor College of Medicine (Microarray Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Baylor College of Medicine (Cytogenetic Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Baylor College of Medicine (Mitochondria Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Baylor College of Medicine (John Walsh Cardiovascular Diagnostic Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Baylor College of Medicine (Whole Genome Sequencing Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Center for Medical Genetics (Molecular Laboratory),  Houston, TX
  • Ben Taub Hospital (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory). Harris County Hospital District, Houston,TX
  • Gene by Gene (FTDNA/DNATraits: Sequencing, NGS & Microarray Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Texas Children's Hospital (Molecular Pathology Laboratory), Houston,TX
  • The Methodist Hospital (Clinical Laboratory Medicine), Houston, TX
  • UT Medical Branch in Galveston (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory), Galveston, TX
  • Northwestern University, ACL Laboratories, Chicago, IL

Applied Research in Basic and Clinical Sciences

The Diagnostic Genetics Program aims to make an important contribution to improving health care through applied research. With a variety of participating Principal Investigators who share a wide range of research interests, these goals are attainable through collaborative, interdisciplinary, and outcome- based clinical research and clinical applications

Funding Opportunities

Working through the financial aid office of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, prospective students may be funded through a variety of sources including federal, state, and departmental funds. These funds come in the forms of loans, grants, and scholarships

Accreditation

The Molecular Genetic Technology program is accredited and has conformed its curriculum to the standards published and monitored by:
National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS)
5600 N. River Rd., Suite 720
Rosemont, IL 60018-5119
Phone: 773-714-8880
Fax: 773-714-8886

Course Listings

STUDENTS must maintain an overall 3.0 average to graduate

Track 1 – Non-Diagnostic Molecular Genetic Technology Majors 

Course 
DG 6100 Clinical Research Seminar I1
DG 6101 Clinical Research Seminar II1
DG 6102 Clinical Investigative Design/Analysis1
DG 6280 Concepts in Molecular Diagnostics2
DG 6290 Clinical Diseases and Applications of Molecular Genetics2
DG 6301 Advanced Practice I3
DG 6320 Bioinformatics I3
DG 6333 Quantitative Research and Advanced Statistics3
DG 6340 Bioinformatics II3
DG 6390 Applied Molecular Diagnostic Techniques3
DG 6401 Advanced Practice II4
DG 6501 Advanced Practice III5
DG 6510 Diagnostic Molecular Laboratory Techniques Lab5
DG 6560 Clinical Molecular Rotation I5
DG 6570 Clinical Molecular Rotation II5
Total46

 

Track 2 – Diagnostic Molecular Genetic Technology Majors 

Course 
DG 6100 Clinical Research Seminar I1
DG 6101 Clinical Research Seminar II1
DG 6102 Clinical Investigative Design/Analysis1
DG 6120 Intermediate Karyotyping1
DG 6152 Clinical Prenatal Cytogenetics1
DG 6240 Advanced Clinical Cytogenetics Techniques2
DG 6301 Advanced Practice I3
DG 6333 Quantitative Research and Advanced Statistics3
DG 6340 Bioinformatics II3
DG 6350 Clinical Laboratory Cytogenetics3
DG 6391 Advanced Topics in Clinical Cytogenetics3
DG 6401 Advanced Practice II4
DG 6501 Advanced Practice III5
DG 6521 Clinical Cytogenetics Rotation I5
DG 6530 Clinical Cytogenetic Laboratory Techniques5
DG 6531 Clinical Cytogenetics Rotation II5
Total46

 

Course Descriptions

All syllabi below open in Adobe PDF format. Download the latest version of Adobe PDF Reader.

DG 6100 Clinical Research Seminar I (1 semester credit hour)
Seminar based course that covers topics in genetics and related fields.

DG 6101 Clinical Research Seminar II (1 semester credit hour)
This is a continuation from Research Seminar I course that covers topics in genetics and related fields.

DG 6102 Clinical Investigative Design/Analysis (1 semester credit hour)
The purpose of this course is to guide the students through the process of writing the first draft of their applied research project.

DG 6120 Intermediate Karyotyping (1 semester credit hour)
A continuation of CC4120, this intermediary course in human G-banded chromosome identification will be a case-based approach to the analysis of chromosome abnormalities commonly seen in constitutional and oncologic cases. Students will apply the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (ISCN) and be prepared to perform literature reviews and in class case discussions.
Laboratory fee of $30.00.

DG 6152 Clinical Prenatal Cytogenetics (1 semester credit hour)
Cytogenetic analysis is the single most frequent test used in laboratory prenatal diagnostic studies. This course summarizes the current status of the field, including diagnostic problems in the laboratory and the clinical problems associated with communicating unexpected laboratory findings. Students will correlate cytogenetic analysis with fetal loss, biochemical screening, ultrasonography, prenatal genetic profiling and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Hands-on laboratory activities included POC dissection, in situ culture set up and harvesting and chromosome analysis of abnormal prenatal cases. Case study analysis will include abnormality identification and drafting of mock written clinical reports.

DG 6240 Advanced Clinical Cytogenetics Techniques (2 semester credit hour)
This two-hour comprehensive course is designed for the study of cancer cytogenetics including solid tumor analysis. Course covers the history of cancer cytogenetics, carcinogenic transformation, random versus nonrandom cytogenetic findings in most common human solid tumors, complex karyotype analysis, result interpretation and composite ISCN writing. The student will also study the mutagenic effects derived from lifestyle and environmental factors as they relate to malignant disease. Cytogenetic characterization of tumor cell lines using G-banding, Q-band, and other special staining is required through case study and presentation. This course combines both lecture and laboratory experience into one integrated learning experience.
Lab fee of $30.00.

DG 6280 Concepts in Molecular Diagnostics (2 semester credit hour)
An advanced study on theories of diagnostic molecular science with respect to specimen handling and processing, framework for quality assurance, summary, result reporting, verification of molecular assays, standards, and standardization; in relation to: extraction, blotting, labeling, PCR, alternative amplification techniques, microarray, and bioinformatics. This course will challenge students with case-based scenarios.

DG 6290 Clinical Disease and Applications of Molecular Genetics (2 semester credit hour)
Focuses on the specific applications of molecular techniques within a variety of disciplines. The disciplines covered include molecular cytogenetics, immunology, infectious diseases, oncology, prenatal and postnatal disorders, and transplantation immunology. Participants will be evaluated by both theoretical and application knowledge through exams and a written paper.

DG 6301 Advanced Practice I (3 semester credit hour)
This is a hypothesis-based original research study. Student must fulfill the requirements of a Master's level applied research work including an approved proposal by the faculty advisor and the Diagnostic Genetics core committee 1 month before the beginning of the term. Graduation with an applied research project is subject to approval by the applied research committee and program core committee, and requires the student to present their projects to a faculty committee both orally and in writing.

DG 6320 Bioinformatics I (3 semester credit hour)
This course will introduce the students to information technology and computer science to the field of molecular biology with special emphasis on molecular evolution. Students will learn how to access, manage and analyze biological information using computer applications for purposes such as assay design, data analysis, data mining, and clinical research and development. Graduate students are assigned independent project to demonstrate their aptitude in acquired skills through development of a bioinformatics pipeline for single gene analyses.

DG 6333 Quantitative Research and Advanced Statistics (3 semester credit hour)
An overview of inferential statistics, including but not limited to: correlation, regression, t-test, Chi square, and ANOVA as a foundation of experimental design, various models, correlation analysis, multiple regression, and factor analysis that emphasizes on clinical research implications and applications.

DG 6340 Bioinformatics II (3 semester credit hour)
This course continues from DG 6320 Bioinformatics I and builds on the concepts introduced in DG 6320 and develop further computational and analytical skills targeted to analysis of genomes. Students are introduced to whole genome analyses with particular focus on Human and pathogen genomes. Students acquire skills in transcriptome and miRNA analyses and are introduced to script development using PERL AND R. Graduate students are assigned independent project to demonstrate their aptitude in acquired skills through development of a bioinformatics pipeline for whole genome or transcriptome analyses.

DG 6350 Clinical Laboratory Cytogenetics (3 semester credit hour)
A blended learning experience of lecture instruction, class discussion, and hands-on clinical laboratory practice on general principles of clinical cytogenetic study. Students will be exposed to numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities, embryogenesis & meiotic outcomes, sex chromosome abnormalities & translocations, congenital versus acquired abnormalities & mosaicism, ethical and counseling issues, and reporting issues & ISCN. Students will gain diagnostic and interpretive skills in a variety of cytogenetic problems. The course requires student to complete a case report of an assigned topic with a brief literature search and review.
Laboratory fee of $30.00.

DG 6390 Applied Molecular Diagnostic Techniques (3 semester credit hour)
This lecture/laboratory course focuses on the specific applications of newer molecular techniques. Participants will have hands-on experiences which may include Real Time PCR using various detection methods, microarray technology, sequencing, and next generation sequencing. Participants in this course will also be challenged at a higher critical thinking level of trouble shooting various diagnostic molecular problems. This course also includes a review for the (ASCP) certification exam.
Lab fee of $30.00

DG 6391 Advanced Topics in Clinical Cytogenetics (3 semester credit hour)
This capstone course integrates learning from all previous taught courses. It is a student-centered course aim to develop critical thinking and knowledge synthesis skills as a cytogenetic technologist. Students will work on case studies to develop their problem solving skills in a clinical cytogenetic environment. Students will also participate in a national review in clinical cytogenetics and a mock CAP inspection. Finally, students will show mastery of the field of cytogenetics through completing essays, written scenarios, practice exams and eventually taking a comprehensive cytogenetic exam.

DG 6401 Advanced Practice II (4 semester credit hour)
This is a continuation of DG6301 Advanced Practice I course. All rules and regulations for completion of the thesis project apply.
Lab fee of $30.00.

G 6501 Advanced Practice III (5 semester credit hour)
This is a continuation of DG6401 Advanced Practice II course. All rules and regulations for completion of the thesis project apply.
Lab fee of $30.00.

DG 6510 Diagnostic Molecular Diagnostic Techniques Lab (5 semester credit hour)
A comprehensive study of maintaining laboratory quality control in accordance with federal, state, and local regulations, as well as College of American Pathologists on-site inspections and proficiency testing. Also, a study of the laboratory skills involved in transporting, preparing, and reporting final results of specimens that include blood, bone marrow, and solid tissue samples. Participants will have hands-on laboratory experiences performing molecular techniques such as but not limited to: DNA extraction, purification, and quantification. Gel electrophoresis preparation and viewing. PCR and Real Time PCR experiments and various calculations for dilutions and concentrations of processing molecular related techniques.
Lab fee of $30.00.

DG 6521 Clinical Cytogenetics Rotation I (5 semester credit hour)
This laboratory rotation involves in-depth study of the different cytogenetic techniques and methods used in constitutional chromosome disorders diagnosis. This laboratory rotation also provides the students an opportunity to observe and participate in the testing algorithms and reflex testing that occur in prenatal and postnatal cytogenetic testing environment. Student is required to perform case studies and prepare a presentation to the laboratory host rotation.
Lab fee of $30.00.

DG 6530 Clinical Cytogenetic Laboratory Techniques (5 semester credit hour)
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of all types of traditional cytogenetic techniques as well as molecular cytogenetic studies by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The course goal is to achieve entry level competency in the workup of patients with constitutional chromosome abnormalities through both didactic and hand-on instruction. Various aspects of quality control and assurance associated with good laboratory practice for most routine cytogenetic methods will be performed and discussed. Students will maintain laboratory notebooks documenting the standard operating procedures with troubleshooting notations.
Lab fee of $30.00.

DG 6531 Clinical Cytogenetics Rotation II (5 semester credit hour)
This laboratory rotation provides the student with intensive study of test procedures and practical application of theory topics in all aspects of the hematological malignant cytogenetic study. Analytical methodologies, as well as the correlation of cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic tests with hematologic disorders are emphasized. Quality control procedures and safety considerations are incorporated to the process of problem-solving and troubleshooting. The course also competency tests students regarding to microscopic cell analysis, photographic techniques, karyotype preparation, evaluation, FISH signal quantitation, and ISCN issues. Student is required to perform case studies and prepare presentations to the laboratory host rotation.

DG 6560 Clinical Molecular Rotation I (5 semester credit hour)
This clinical laboratory rotation includes the study of molecular diagnostic procedures utilizing recombinant DNA technology and its application to the many aspects of the clinical laboratory. Laboratory experiences may include but not limited to: DNA specimen handling and processing, DNA extraction, DNA purification, Southern blot analysis, probe preparation and utilization, PCR, primer design, Real-Time PCR, microarray, FISH, and DNA sequencing.
Lab fee of $30.00.

6570 Clinical Molecular Rotation II (5 semester credit hour)
This clinical laboratory rotation is a continuation of DG6560. This clinical laboratory rotation includes the study of molecular diagnostic procedures utilizing recombinant DNA technology and its application to the many aspects of the clinical laboratory. Laboratory experiences may include DNA specimen handling and processing, DNA extraction, DNA purification, Southern blot analysis, probe preparation and utilization, PCR, primer design, Real-Time PCR, microarray, FISH, and DNA sequencing.
Lab fee of $30.00.

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