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Molecular Genetic Technology

Molecular genetic technologists study the role of genetics in medicine, Mendelian genetics, multifactorial inheritance, DNA structure, chromosome structure, population genetics, mutation rates, ethnicity of disease and genetic mapping.

Degree Offered

Bachelor of Science in Molecular Genetic Technology

The program is administered by:

Program Director: Peter Hu, M.S., Ph.D., MLS(ASCP)cmCGcm,MBcm
Local phone: (713) 563-3095
Long distance: 1-(800) 551-9503
Fax: (713) 745-3337
E-mail: pchu@mdanderson.org

Education Coordinator: Irene Newsham, Ph.D., MB(ASCP)cm

Sr. Health Professions Educator: Vibuhti Srivastava, Ph.D., MB(ASCP)cm

Sr. Health Professions Educator: Mary Coolbaugh-Muphy, Ph.D., MB(ASCP)cm

Medical Advisor: Raja Luthra, Ph.D.

Complete list of MGT & SHP faculty

The Program in Molecular Genetic Technology

Mission

The MD Anderson Cancer Center Program in Molecular Genetic Technology, in conjunction  with the mission and vision of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, is committed to the education of technically and academically competent graduates prepared to meet the immediate and future needs of the Molecular Genetic Technology profession.

Objectives

The Molecular Genetic Technology program is designed to prepare students to become entry-level clinical molecular genetic technologists. The program provides instruction in major areas of the field such as:

  • Pre- and Post-natal genetic disorder testing
  • Cancer molecular genetic testing
  • Infectious disease testing
  • Human identity testing

The curriculum provides didactic training followed by directed clinical training at affiliated hospitals and laboratories. Students may enter the program to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree and program faculty help each student develop a focal point related to the learner's area of interest. In the course of their training, students learn how to detect DNA polymorphisms and interpret molecular tests. They also develop an understanding of the essential elements of statistics in population genetics.

While students study molecular diagnostic procedures such as SNP analysis and its application to the clinical laboratory, their laboratory experiences may include but are not limited to:

  • Hybridization methods
  • Extraction methods
  • PCR, primer design and real-time PCR,RT-PCR, and Melt Curve Analysis
  • Sequencing and fragment analysis
  • Microarray technology
  • Next generation sequencing

Students also focus on the specific applications of molecular techniques within such disciplines as:

  • Oncology
  • Paternity
  • Genetic disease of inheritance
  • Forensics
  • Infectious disease
  • Bacteriology

Professionals in the field have a wide range of career options. As the Human Genome Project leads to the discovery of an increasing number of genes important in human disease processes, molecular genetic technologists will play an ever-increasing role in diagnostic patient care.

Employment opportunities include:

  • Cancer centers
  • Pediatric clinics
  • Chemical industries
  • Biotechnology companies
  • Research, molecular cytogenetic and pathology laboratories
  • Computer imaging sales and development
  • Research and teaching institutions

Some molecular genetic technologists combine administrative and managerial talent with their technical background to become laboratory or hospital administrators.

Selection Process

Admission is dependent on factors that include:

  • Cumulative GPA, as well as Science and Math GPA
  • Personal qualities such as maturity and professional goals as expressed in the interview and described in reference letters.
  • Ability to meet the SHP non-academic technical standards.
  • Race, religion, national origin, veteran status, gender, or disability are not factors considered in the selection process

Applicants should begin the application process three to six months prior to the application deadline to ensure all documents are received and processed by the UTHSC-Houston Registrar's office

Nonacademic Requirements

For a description of the non-academic technical standards requirements for admission, visit the admission section of the Student Catalog's Policies and Procedures.

Program Admission Requirements

The Bachelor of Science degree is either a one-year or two-year program with entry at either the junior or senior level. Application and supporting documents must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. Qualified students are accepted on a rolling basis.

Applicants to the Program in Molecular Genetic Technology must satisfy the following requirements for admission:

All prerequisite course work must be from a regionally accredited college or university.

The applicant must have satisfactorily completed all prerequisite courses listed prior to graduating. These courses must be lecture and laboratory courses acceptable toward a degree by majors in those fields and cannot be survey courses.

Minimum overall grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale both overall and in science and mathematics courses is required to be considered for admission. Special circumstances may be considered, but at the discretion of the Admissions Committee.

Texas Success Initiative (TSI) - All applicants must provide proof of successful assessment of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI). Applicants who have graduated with an associate or baccalaureate degree from an accredited Texas College or University are exempt from TSI. Proof of an applicant's readiness to enroll in college level course work will be determined by the Registrar's Office based upon review of official transcripts from previously attended institutions.

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) - Applicants from countries where English is not the native language may be required to take the TOEFL. Internet based TOEFL is now available and a total test score ranging from 74-78 with a minimum score of 18 in each section is required.

Prerequisites

Prerequisites for the two-year program

A minimum of 60 semester credit hours (SCH) that includes:

Within these 60 hours, the following must be included:

  • 8 SCH in Biological Sciences
  • 16 SCH hours in Chemistry to include Organic Chemistry and /or Biochemistry

Note: 12 of the above 24 SCH may be satisfied by the Natural Sciences Texas Core course selection

Prerequisites for the one-year program

A minimum of 90 semester credit hours (SCH) that includes:

Within these 90 hours, the following must be included:

  • 12 SCH of upper level division courses (3000, 4000)
  • 8 SCH in Biological Sciences
  • 16 SCH hours in Chemistry to include Organic Chemistry and /or Biochemistry
  • 3 - 4 SCH of Microbiology
  • 3 - 4 SCH of Genetics

About the Texas Core Curriculum

Each institution's Core Curriculum applies to all academic degrees. They range from 42 to 48 credit hours, depending on the college or university. Each Core Curriculum is divided into 8 or 9 categories that are common across the state. If you take the approved Core natural science courses at institution A, they are annotated on your transcript with a Core code by A and must be accepted as fulfilling that portion of the Core at institution B or any other Texas public institution. If Astronomy is a Core natural science at A and is not at B, it must still be accepted at B. This is a whole new way of doing things because the school where you take the course decides how it will transfer. And that decision is binding on any Texas school to which you transfer.

The official site for the Texas Core Curriculum: http://statecore.its.txstate.edu/

Advanced Placement

The School of Health Professions accepts and/or awards credit through the following examination programs:

  • College level examination program of the College Board
  • Comprehensive departmental examinations
  • Regionally accredited military training programs

Recommendations from the School's academic departments are followed with regard to minimum score requirements, level of credit and amount of credit to be awarded. Program faculty are consulted to determine if credit recommendations equate to specific School of Health Professions (SHP) courses. The internal comprehensive departmental examination program provides a local means for establishing knowledge of SHS course content in areas not covered by the above examination program. Programs may elect to administer examinations that cover material specific to SHS courses with the results being reported to the Registrar.

Graduation

Each candidate for a baccalaureate degree must complete a minimum of 130 semester credit hours of course work. Within this requirement, students must complete the following at MD Anderson:

  • At least 40 semester credit hours of advanced (3000/4000) course work
  • At least 25% of the total semester credit hours required must be taken at MD Anderson

Graduation occurs in August. Upon graduation, students are eligible to take the national certification exam in molecular biology given by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP)

Please check with the program director for application deadlines and exam dates. Upon passing the exam, the student is considered a certified molecular genetic technologist. The awarding of the degree is not contingent upon a student passing the national certification exam.

Curriculum

This intensive two-year program is composed of a didactic phase followed by directed clinical training at affiliated hospitals and laboratories. During the didactic phase, formal lectures are presented on the principles of medical genetics, molecular and biochemical basis of genetic disease, hematology, molecular biology, clinical molecular genetics and molecular genetic technology. Laboratory sessions coordinated to lectures and covering the fundamentals of diagnostic laboratory procedures are included in the didactic phase..

Current Affiliations

During the clinical phase of instruction, training and supervision are provided inaffiliated clinical laboratories:

  • UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (Diagnostic Molecular Science Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (HLA Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (DNA Analysis Core Facility), Houston, TX
  • Baylor College of Medicine (Diagnostic Sequencing Laboratory), Houston
  • Baylor College of Medicine (Microarray Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Baylor College of Medicine (Mitochondria Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Baylor College of Medicine (John Walsh Cardiovascular Diagnostic Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Baylor College of Medicine (Whole Genome Sequencing Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Center for Medical Genetics, Houston, TX
  • De Novo Diagnostics, Houston, TX
  • Ben Taub Hospital (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory) Harris County Hospital District, Houston,TX
  • Gene by Gene (FTDNA/DNATraits - Sequencing, NGS and Microarray Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • Texas Children's Hospital (Molecular Pathology Laboratory), Houston, TX
  • The Methodist Hospital (Clinical Laboratory Medicine), Houston, TX
  • Applied Diagnostic Laboratory, Houston, TX
  • Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center, Houston, TX
  • Companion DX, Houston, TX
  • MolecularHealth, The Woodlands, TX
  • Clinical Pathology Laboratories, Inc. (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory), Austin, TX
  • UT Medical Branch in Galveston (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory), Galveston, TX
  • UTHSC San Antonio (Molecular Pathology Laboratory), San Antonio, TX
  • Delta Pathology Group, LLC. (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory), Shreveport, LA
  • Massachusetts General Hospital – Harvard University Medical School (Department of Pathology), Boston, MA
  • Duke University (Department of Pathology), Durham, NC
  • Emory University (Department of Human Genetics), Atlanta, GA
  • Oklahoma State Department of Health, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Greenwood Genetics Laboratory, Greenwood, SC
  • The University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (Department of Genetics), Philadelphia, PA
  • The University of Chicago (Department of Human Genetics), Chicago, IL
  • Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Bronx, NY
  • Quest Diagnostics (Molecular Oncology Laboratory), Chantilly, VA
  • ARUP Laboratories (Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory), Salt Lake City, UT
  • Propath, Dallas, TX
  • Orchid Cellmark, Dallas, TX
  • Queens Medical Center, Honolulu, HI

Accreditation

The Molecular Genetic Technology program is accredited by and has conformed its curriculum to the standards published and monitored by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS).

Course Listings

Junior Year Courses28 SCH
Laboratory Sciences: shared core courses8
HS 3102 Molecular Techniques Lab1
HS 3210 Laboratory Mathematics2
HS 4310 Medical Microbiology3
HS 4100 Issues in Health Care Ethics1
HS 4101 Diversity and Cultural Competence1
MGT Program Core20
HS 3201 Molecular Biology2
HS 3203 Basic Molecular Techniques Laboratory II2
HS 3270 Critical Thinking in Health Professions2
HS 3254 Immunohistochemistry2
HS 3320 Medical Genetics3
HS 3300 Immunology3
HS 3330 Pathology of Body Fluids3
HS 4300 Pathophysiology3
MGT Program Electives; choose 2 SCH from:2
DI 4310 Teaching Strategies in Health Care Education3
HS 3110 Medical Terminology1
HS 3333 Statistics3
HS 3340 Research Methods3
HS 3370 Fundamentals of Writing and Critical Thinking3
HS 4111L Medical Microbiology Lab1
HS 4160 Critical Scientific Analysis1
HS 4161 Seminar in Healthcare1
Senior Year Courses**46 SCH
CC 4120 Introduction to G-band Karyotyping1
GT 4300 Advanced Medical Genetics3
GT 4330 Genetics of Hematological Disease3
HS 4110 Intro to Clinical Molecular Genetics Technology1
HS 4371 Management and Education3
MG 4160 Genetic Technology Journal Club1
MG 4280 Concepts in Molecular Diagnostics2
MG 4290 Clinical Applications of Molecular Biology2
MG 4300 Bioinformatics in Diagnostic Genetics I3
MG 4301 Bioinformatics in Diagnostic Genetics II3
MG 4310 Molecular Diagnostic Techniques3
MG 4320 Advanced Concepts in Molecular Genetics3
MG 4390 Advanced Molecular Diagnostic Techniques3
MG 4510 Molecular Diagnostic Techniques Lab5
MG 4560 Molecular Diagnostics Clinical Rotation I5
MG 4570 Molecular Diagnostics Clinical Rotation II5


**Students entering the School of Health Professions for the first time at the Senior level must take the following additional required courses that are described in the Junior Year for Laboratory Sciences section of the catalog:

  • HS 4100 Issues in Health Care Ethics
  • HS 4101 Diversity and Cultural Competence

Course Descriptions

DI 3345 Directed Readings (1-3 semester credit hours) Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Credit hours are based on size, length and depth of paper or project.

DI 3346 Professional Development (Conferences, Workshops, Lectures, Competitions) - Repeatable (1-3 semester credit hours)
Attendance of educational sessions at district, state, regional or national conferences. Consent of instructor required. 12 documented contact hours per each (32 CE) credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

DI 4300 Research Techniques in Radiologic Sciences (3 semester credit hours)
This course will teach the student the principles and methods of conducting practical research in health care.

DI 4301 Research Project
(3 semester credit hours)
This course will prepare the student to complete a research project.

DI 4304 Sectional Anatomy (3 semester credit hours) (3 semester credit hours)
This course will provide a review of the gross anatomy of the entire body. Detailed study of gross anatomical structures will be conducted systematically for location, relationship to other structures and function. Structures are located and identified in axial (transverse), sagittal, coronal and orthogonal (oblique) planes. Illustrations and anatomic images will be compared with MR, ultrasound and CT images in the same imaging planes and at the same level when applicable. The characteristic appearance of each anatomical structure as it appears on CT, MR and ultrasound, when applicable, will be stressed.

DI 4310 Teaching Strategies in Health Care Education (3 semester credit hours)
This course will teach the student how to analyze learning theories with emphasis on adult learners and the elements of quality education.

DI 4311 Instructional Design (3 semester credit hours)
This course will instruct the student in the theory and application of instructional design in health care education and training.

DI 4312 Patient Education (3 semester credit hours)
This course will teach the student how to plan, develop and assess patient education products and methods.

DI 4322 Effective Human Resources Management (3 semester credit hours)
This course will teach the student about staff recruitment, retention techniques, and laws related resource management. Topics include hiring and terminating personnel, and the issues of harassment and discrimination.

DI 4350 Introduction to Computed Tomography (3 semester credit hours)
This course will teach the Radiation Therapy student how to produce quality Computed Tomography images while  ensuring the well-being  and safety of patients.  The course content will allow the student to understand basic CT physics so that they are able to identify deficiencies in images and how to take corrective actions. The Student will develop an understanding between the connections of choices they make when selecting scan parameters and the radiation dose delivered to the patient. CT simulated laboratory sessions will be included as part of the course content.

HS 3370 Fundamentals of Writing and Critical Thinking (3 semester credit hours)
This basic writing course stresses both reading and writing skills and is designed to teach students to improve their ability to write logically and develop short essays, brief formal summaries, and reports.

HS 4100 Issues in Health Care Ethics (1 semester credit hour)
This course content is designed to establish a foundation and set parameters of professional practice for health care professionals. The emphasis will be on developing the background for the resolution of ethical dilemmas through ethical reasoning, ethical obligations in health professional-patient relationships and just allocation of scarce health care resources.

HS 4101 Diversity and Cultural Competence
(1 semester credit hour)
This course is designed to provide each student with a fundamental  understanding of  the concepts of cultural competency, diversity, and inclusion. The course content of each module emphasizes the following seven culturally competent areas of diversity: Building Relationships across Culture; Communication Across Differences; Conflict resolution Across Cultures ; Microinequities within the Workplace;. Diversity and Inclusion;  Abilities: A Journey from Exclusion to Inclusion; Spirituality and health care practices.

HS 4111 Medical Law (1 semester credit hour)
This course introduces the student to medical law and case studies in medical imaging and radiation therapy.

HS 4300 Pathophysiology
(3 semester credit hours)
This course is designed to provide basic knowledge in pathophysiology in preparation for professional studies in the health sciences. Topic covered includes central concepts of pathophysiology of the cells and tissues and alterations on organs and systems with an emphasis on carcinogenesis.

HS 4303 Advance Pathophysiology (3 semester credit hours) (Offer for 08-09 for Juniors)
This course presents the imaging disease process and its effects on image quality.

RT 4199 Special Topics in Radiation Therapy
This course is designed for individual projects, research, special seminars, or further investigation of emerging technology or treatment in radiation therapy. Semester credit hours are assigned in relationship to the complexity of the individual student's goals.

RT 3101 Simulation and Treatment Techniques I (1 semester credit hour)
This course is taught in the laboratory setting. Students are required to demonstrate accurate simulation and/or treatment set-up procedures and patient immobilization for basic to immediate radiation therapy treatment protocols.
 
RT 3103 Simulation and Treatment Techniques II (1 semester credit hour)
This course is taught in the laboratory setting. Students are required to demonstrate accurate simulation and/or treatment set-up procedures for intermediate to advanced radiation therapy treatment protocols.

RT 3205 Introduction to Radiation Therapy (2 semester credit hours)
This course includes roles and responsibilities of radiation oncology personnel, medical terminology, basic patient care, practice standards of a radiation therapist and the hospital staff hierarchy.

RT 3220 Clinical Education I
(2 semester credit hours)
This course provides supervised clinical education in which students are assigned to a specific patient. The student will observe the patients from consultation through treatment. Students are required to present in a formal setting the educational findings related to their patient's treatment regime. Students must demonstrate competency in block fabrication, patient immobilization, patient transfer techniques, bolus, vital signs and basic patient care. Students are assigned a mentor for the development of a master-apprentice relationship.

RT 3221 Clinical Education II (2 semester credit hours)
This course provides supervised clinical education in which students are required to demonstrate basic to intermediate ARRT and Programmatic competencies in treatment planning and delivery, quality assurance, patient care, brachytherapy and professional growth. Students are assigned a mentor for the development of a master-apprentice relationship.

RT 3222 Clinical Education III (2 semester credit hours)
Continuation of RT 3321.

RT 3342 Digital Imaging for Radiation Therapists
This course will teach the student about digital imaging in routine and specialized 2-D and 3-D images, data management and fusion practices

RT 3345
Directed Readings (1-3 semester credit hours) Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Credit hours are based on size, length, and depth of paper or project.

RT 4101 Radiation Safety and Protection (1 semester credit hour)
This course requires the student to demonstrate a detailed understanding of atomic structure, types of ionizing radiation, radiation detection devices, units of measurement, personal and public radiation safety practices and dose limitations from brachytherapy sources and external beam radiation devices. The course identifies radiation regulatory and advisory agencies and the specific requirements of each.

RT 4111 Clinical Radiation Oncology I Lab (1 semester credit hour)
Hands on practical application of treatment concepts covered in RT 4211 Clinical Radiation Oncology I.

RT 4112 Clinical Radiation Oncology II Lab (1 semester credit hour)
Hands on practical application of treatment concepts covered in RT 4212 Clinical Radiation Oncology II

RT 4199 Special Topics in Radiation Therapy (1 SCH)
This course is designed for individual projects, research, special seminars, or further investigation of emerging technology or treatment in radiation therapy.  Semester credit hours are assigned in relationship to the complexity of the individual student's goals.

RT 4210 Radiobiology (2 semester credit hours)
This course presents the students with cellular, subcellular and tissue biology. The course requires the students to discriminate between types of cellular damage caused by ionizing radiation. Additionally, students are exposed to proliferation kinetics, fractionated radiotherapy, acute and chronic effects of radiation on human cells and body systems, principles of linear energy transfer and relative biologic effectiveness and the impact of radiosensitizers and radioprotectors on patient treatment.

RT 4211 Clinical Radiation Oncology I (2 semester credit hours)
This course presents an in-depth study of multidisciplinary treatment of the cancer patient from the clinician's viewpoint. Students are required to master concepts specific to site-specific disease including: histopathology, etiologic and epidemiology factors, detection and diagnosis, tumor stage and grade, routes of metastases, dose fractionation and prognostic factors. This course is designed to approach each cancer type by anatomic system, addressing treatment factors with increasing degrees of complexity.

RT 4212 Clinical Radiation Oncology II
(2 semester credit hours)
Continuation of 4211 Clinical Radiation Oncology I
Prerequisite for Radiation Therapy students: RT 4211

RT 4302 Anatomy for Radiation Oncology (3 semester credit hours)
This course addresses the anatomical study of the human body in topographical, sagittal, transverse and coronal planes.

RT 4305 Patient Care in Radiation Oncology
(3 semester credit hours)
The focus of this course is providing the student with advanced skills in oncologic patient care and assessment. Students are required to demonstrate, under varying patient conditions, physical and psychological assessment, cause and effect of clinical laboratory values, management of oncologic emergencies and treatment regimens of radiation induced site-specific treatment side effects. This course contains a laboratory component.

RT 4306 Technical Radiation Oncology
(3 semester credit hours)
Students master basic concepts of radiation therapy and the technical aspects of radiation oncology, including: custom block, mold and immobilization fabrication, B-mode acquisition and targeting, intensity modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, intraoperative radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Principles of surgery and chemotherapy along with routine simulation procedures in radiation oncology are presented. Students are required to participate in hands-on simulation laboratory activities.

RT 4309 Special Applications in Radiation Oncology
(3 semester credit hours)
This course presents principles of advanced practice -- such as fusion imaging, respiratory gating, stereotactic radiosurgery -- and current advancements in treatment techniques.

RT 4310 Radiation Therapy Physics (3 semester credit hours)
This course reviews atomic structure, interactions with matter and inverse square law. A detailed study is presented of the operation and function of radiotherapeutic equipment to include linear accelerators, cobalt units, superficial and orthovoltage units. Students are required to identify equipment faults and the appropriate responses to clearing faults. Equivalent Square and interpolation of data are introduced. Acquisition of radiation beam data, parameters required in accurate dose calculation, the effects of wedges, blocking, filters and beam configuration are discussed. Students are required to demonstrate accurate dose calculations for various beam configurations.

RT 4311 Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning and Dosimetry
(3 semester credit hours)
This course stresses the application of brachytherapy calculative techniques, evaluation of distributions to calculate implant duration, analysis of emerging technology and terminology as they relate to current practice, comparing and contrasting hand calculations and combinations to computer output and applying formula calculations to advanced and complex treatment problems. Specific disease and site-specific concepts of treatment planning and medical dosimetry are presented. Students demonstrate their understanding of external photon and electron beam treatment planning in the production and analysis of treatment plans for head and neck, central nervous system, thoracic, breast, abdominal and pelvic tumors.
Prerequisite:
RT 4310

RT 4312 Quality Management in Radiation Oncology (3 semester credit hours)
This course is an in-depth study of quality management and quality assurance components in radiation oncology. Students are required to demonstrate the knowledge and skills to develop a quality management program that includes: allocation of human and physical resources; quality assurance and acceptance testing of linear accelerators, simulators and brachytherapy sources; patient and personnel
protection policies; and patient and professional satisfaction. Data collection and analysis of quality indicators are required. Students are required to complete a hands-on laboratory component.

RT 4315 Radiation Physics and Medical Imaging (3 SCH)
This course will address basic concepts of radiation sciences, atomic structure, radiations interaction with matter, radiographic techniques used in image production, production of therapeutic radiation, electron and proton beams.

RT 4320 Clinical Education in Radiation Therapy IV (3 semester credit hours)
This course provides supervised clinical education in which students are required to demonstrate ARRT competency in treatment planning and delivery, quality assurance, patient care, block and mold fabrication, brachytherapy procedures along with advanced program competencies and professional growth. Students are assigned a mentor for the development of a master-apprentice relationship.

RT 4321 Clinical Education in Radiation Therapy V (3 semester credit hours)
This course provides supervised clinical education in which students are required to demonstrate ARRT competency in treatment planning and delivery, quality assurance, patient care, block and mold fabrication, brachytherapy procedures along with advanced program competencies and professional growth. Students are assigned a mentor for the development of a master-apprentice relationship.
Prerequisite: RT 4320

RT 4322 Clinical Education in Radiation Therapy VI (3 semester credit hours)
This course is a continuation of RT 4321. Students are assigned a mentor for the development of a master-apprentice relationship and will be responsible for a demonstration of final competency.
Prerequisite: RT 4321

RT 4356 Individual Projects
This course is designed to provide a review of knowledge in clinical oncology in preparation for the registry examination.  Topics cover the concepts of various cancers, staging, and treatment techniques. Appropriate diagnostic and treatment procedures are also covered. Students are required to design, develop and present specific individualized projects.

RT 4390 Adaptive Radiation Therapy (3 semester credit hours)
Students will demonstrate problem-solving and critical thinking skills related to the daily issues of a radiation oncology department.
Situations presented will require technical and professional judgment as they relate to accuracy of patient treatment. Continued professional development through national certification, state licensure and life-long learning opportunities will be emphasized.

RT 4395 Problem and Solving and Decision Making in Radiation Therapy (3 semester credit hours)
This course will require students to demonstrate problem-solving and critical thinking skills related to real life radiation therapy challenges. Situations involving patient care, patient set-up and treatment, simulation and issues of a psychosocial nature are covered. The course serves as a capstone in the curriculum and prepares the student for national certification and professional employment.


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