Skip to Content

Lymphoma & Myeloma

Welcome to the Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma. Here you can learn more about the department and its people, the latest in treatment options for patients and new research discoveries.

From caring for patients, to conducting clinical and translational research, our physicians and staff are dedicated to making strides in understanding and conquering these cancers which affect the body’s blood and lymph systems. Our motto: caring with integrity and innovation.

One of the largest multi-disciplinary programs for lymphoma and myeloma in the U.S., the department includes 21 faculty members, 18 of whom see and treat patients. Our patients benefit from a team approach that includes our colleagues in radiology, surgery, radiation therapy, hematopathology and stem cell transplantation, as well as clinical pharmacists, research and clinical nurses, social workers and dietitians.

Through ongoing clinical trials, our patients have access to the best of what is coming out of the world’s cancer laboratories, in a holistic approach that matches the appropriate treatment to each individual patient’s needs. In addition to testing new drugs and therapies, our clinical trials investigate combinations of standard drugs given in novel ways and treatments designed to reduce toxicities for patients. Many of the regimens used or drugs first studied in this department are now considered the standard treatments. Currently, we are studying several novel therapies with unique mechanisms of actions, including small molecules, monoclonal antibodies and immunotoxins.

Our laboratory’s translational research program is dedicated to turning the discoveries of basic science, from fields such as molecular science and genetics, into effective treatments for patients. Among current areas of investigation: the development of tumor vaccines, new antibodies, the interaction of Hodgkin disease cells and normal cells, specific viruses which may cause lymphomas, reasons why T-cell lymphoma appears resistant to standard drugs and potential development of new small molecule signal transduction inhibitors to treat lymphoma and myeloma.


© 2014 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center