Cancerwise - February 2017 Archive | MD Anderson Cancer Center Skip to Content
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BY LeighAnna Hutchinson

Before I was diagnosed with cancer in June 1998, I wanted to be a princess, a teacher or a veterinarian.

Instead, I became a registered nurse at MD Anderson Children’s Cancer Hospital — the place that saved my life. And it’s all because of the outstanding care I received here as a child.

Dual diagnosis: granulocytic sarcoma and acute myeloid leukemia

My cancer story began the summer after first grade. At the time,...

Cancerwise blog post: LeighAnna Hutchinson became a nurse at MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital after surviving acute myeloid leukemia and granulocytic sarcoma as a child.

BY Devon Carter

At increased risk for skin cancer? You may need regular skin cancer screening exams. These screening exams help find skin cancer early, when...

BY Darrell Sawyer

My journey to MD Anderson began in November 2012, when I came down with what I thought was a 24-hour stomach flu. My doctor referred me to...

BY Hans Rueffert

When you first come to MD Anderson, you may be so overwhelmed that you have a real sense of urgency when you get here. Maybe you feel like there’s an alien invader in your body, so you want to jump straight into chemo.

I understand that desire. I was diagnosed with stomach cancer in July 2005, and I ended up having both my stomach and my esophagus surgically removed.

But my advice is to slow down. It took about a month to...

Cancerwise blog post: Hans Rueffert, who received a stomach cancer diagnosis, shares his advice for other cancer patients.

BY Amy Countiss

When my very first mammogram revealed stage IIIC breast cancer, I was dealt the shock of my life.

My mother died just seven months...

BY Austin Williamson

As someone who’s still in the midst of his cancer journey, I can honestly tell you that having cancer isn’t all doom and gloom. In fact, living...

BY Ronnie Pace

As I approach the fourth anniversary of my original male breast cancer diagnosis in March 2013, it occurs to me that the feelings which overwhelmed...

BY Mena El-Sharkawi

If you ask Tracy E. Thomas, living with cancer becomes much easier when you learn to shift your focus to something else. For him, that’s meant...

BY Michael Terry

I grew up in a medical family. My father was a doctor, and my mother was hospital dietitian. So, I've been familiar with medicine and medical...

BY Lany Kimmons

Hashmat Effendi has spent much of her life organizing teams of medical professionals from the United States to travel to various developing...

BY Kellie Bramlet

While there are no foods that can kill cancer cells, the foods you eat during cancer treatment can have a big impact. Changes to your diet...

BY Mena El-Sharkawi

Random nose bleeds and unexplained bruises were Edgar Villalta’s first clues that something was wrong. Then little red dots appeared all over...

BY Gabrielle Turner

I might be the only MD Anderson patient who never had cancer. Or, at least, that’s how I felt on that winter day in 2008 when I first entered...

BY Kia Wynn

In June 2015, I was visiting my parents when I came down with a sore throat and found a flesh-colored lump on the right side of my tongue....

BY James Coulson Jr.

One of the things that I learned as a testicular cancer patient at MD Anderson is that distraction is the name of the game. Our brains are...

BY Cammie Shaddock

My brain tumor diagnosis came suddenly. I had no pain, headaches or any kind of warning. On Oct. 3, 2016, I had difficulty conveying my thoughts...

BY Hans Rueffert

The connection between what we eat and how we feel is so elementary, yet for some reason we forget or push it to the side.

But as a...

BY Dolores B. Landry

After an MRI in 2004 for back pain, my doctor found a cyst on the right side of my stomach that had to come out. A surgeon in Abbeville, Louisiana...