Cancerwise Blog: Cancer patient stories of hope | MD Anderson Cancer Center Skip to Content
Top

BY Meagan Raeke

Imagine being able to talk to your doctors during brain tumor surgery without pain and give them immediate feedback while they operate. That’s exactly what happens during an awake craniotomy.

A craniotomy is a type of surgery where a piece of the skull is temporarily removed to access the brain. In an awake craniotomy, the patient is woken up during surgery. MD Anderson doctors perform more than 90 awake craniotomies...

Awake craniotomy specialists neuroanesthesiologist Shreyas Bhavsar, D.O., and neurosurgeon Jeffrey Weinberg

BY Tara Kirk

When I was 6 years old, my mother died from cancer. She was only 35, and at the time, her death came as a shock to everyone in our family....

BY Sara K. Parker

When my daughter Aaliyah was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma in November 2016 at age 9, I was shattered, vacillating hourly between two nearly...

BY Kellie Bramlet Blackburn

There’s no one food that can cure cancer, but that doesn’t stop such myths from circulating. And while researchers are starting to find some links between nutrition and cancer, more research is needed.

The ketogenic diet – also called the keto diet -- is among those diets rumored to cure cancer. We talked to Maria Petzel, a senior clinical dietitian at MD Anderson, to learn more. Here’s what she had to say.

What is the keto...

Foods from the keto -- or ketogenic -- diet, including almonds, blueberries and avocadoes

BY Thomas Suchyta

I was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre disease in 2012 and chronic inflammatory demyelating polyneuropathy (CIDP) in 2013. But I learned that...

BY Pamela J. Schlembach, M.D.

Many breast cancer patients undergo radiation therapy as part of their treatment. While radiation therapy often comes with side effects, such...

BY Laura Nathan-Garner

When someone you know receives a cancer diagnosis, you want to help. But how?

Instead of asking what you can do to help, it’s usually...

BY Debora Batchelor

I don’t like change. But sometimes you have to be willing to make one in order to survive.

That’s what I did. I’m a small town girl...

BY Layne Compston

I learned early on that my mom is more fragile than most people.

Radiation treatments she received as a teenager for stage III nasopharyngeal...

BY Aaliyah Parker

In November 2016, when I was 9 years old, I was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma. My parents took me to MD Anderson, where I had chemotherapy...