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BY Jan Lewin, Ph.D.

The ability to swallow — or to eat and drink what you enjoy most without choking or coughing — is something that many of us take for granted. And most people never think about how they eat or drink until they experience dysphagia, or trouble swallowing. 

Many people also believe that if their ability to swallow is compromised because of a cancer diagnosis or its treatment, it will simply get better after treatment is finished...

Woman drinking from a glass of water

BY Jeff Deatsman

MD Anderson is a very humbling place. When I was there for my tonsil cancer treatments in late 2016 and early 2017, I’d always see someone...

BY Jeff Deatsman

When an ear, nose and throat doctor confirmed that I had tonsil cancer in October 2016, it came as something of a relief. I know that probably...

BY Laura Nathan-Garner

In 2017, dozens of our cancer patients shared the stories of their diagnosis, treatment and life after cancer here on Cancerwise. As they told us about their challenges and fears, they revealed their strength, courage and resilience. And in the process, they each gave us hope.

Here are 10 of our most-read patient stories from 2017.

Ovarian cancer patient thankful for immunotherapy clinical trial
When Cathy Tompkins...

Cancerwise blog post: Popular blogs dealing with hope after a cancer diagnosis and advice during cancer treatment

BY John Chattaway

At age 62, Tom Jackson was diagnosed with prostate cancer. The diagnosis is common among men his age, so he took it in stride.

But...

BY Michael Terry

I grew up in a medical family. My father was a doctor, and my mother was hospital dietitian. So, I've been familiar with medicine and medical...

BY Michael Terry

While I was shaving one morning in 2012, I noticed a large lump under my jaw. I immediately made an appointment to see an ear, nose and throat...

BY Katie Brooks

You’ve probably heard about MD Anderson’s Moon Shots Program™. But what is it?

We asked Ernest Hawk, M.D., co-leader of the Colorectal...

BY Anton Blender

It started with a sore throat. Brian German, 44, assumed he'd picked it up from one of his three children. But when it persisted, Brian examined...