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BY Lany Kimmons

Patients' fertility can be affected both during cancer treatment – when an unplanned pregnancy could be a serious problem – and later, if the cancer treatment causes infertility. For patients who want to have children, this can be devastating. But new advances are giving hope – and options – to patients who want to have children.

Here Terri Woodard, M.D., who leads the MD Anderson Oncofertility Consult Service, answers 10 questions...

Physician

BY JoAnn Hill

Before 2011, a typical six-month time span didn’t involve many life-altering situations or events for me. But that all changed when I hit...

BY Erika Vandiver

I was 20 weeks pregnant with my second child when my doctor told me, "You have breast cancer." I was only 28 years old -- 20 years...