Top

BY Stephanie Madsen

Three years after my large cell neuroendocrine cervical cancer diagnosis, I've defied the odds. The statistics gave me less than a 20% chance of surviving one year.

But I have yet to make it an entire year without cancer. I've hit the three-month mark and have even made it to eight months cancer-free. Soon, I'll lie on the cold, hard, metallic table while a machine takes pictures of my insides from head to toe. Then, I'll wait...

Large cell cervical cancer survivor Stephanie Madsen shares her thoughts on scanxiety and follow-up exams.

BY Amanda Woodward

Pregnancy can do some crazy things to your, well ... everything! In my case, with both my first and now second pregnancies, my skin has broken...

BY Karen Basen-Engquist, Ph.D.

To live long, healthy lives and lower their chances of recurrence, breast cancer survivors should focus on staying active and watching...

BY Michele Longabaugh

Like many cancer survivors, my anal cancer checkups are on a set schedule. Currently, my PET scans are every three months. No matter the distance between each cancer scan, I tend to remain worry-free about them between scans.

But those around me tend to obsess over my upcoming tests. They are always asking when I am going to get another cancer scan, whether it hurts or if I am worried about them. I always laugh and tell them...