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BY Scott Merville

Obese patients with metastatic melanoma who are treated with targeted or immune therapies live significantly longer than those with a normal body mass index (BMI), investigators report in a study published in Lancet Oncology of 1,918 patients in six independent clinical cohorts.

This effect, referred to as the “Obesity Paradox”, principally manifested itself in men, said Jennifer McQuade, M.D., lead author and instructor...

metastatic melanoma

BY Scott Merville

A cold virus engineered to attack the most common and deadly of brain tumors allowed 20% of patients with recurrent glioblastoma to live for...

BY Scott Merville

Organizations in Spain and Saudi Arabia recognized the leadership of Jim Allison, Ph.D., MD Anderson chair of Immunology, in cultivating the...

BY Scott Merville

A pair of targeted therapies given before and after surgery for melanoma produced at least a six-fold increase in time to progression compared to standard-of-care surgery for patients with stage 3 disease, MD Anderson researchers found in a recent study. Patients who had no sign of disease at surgery after combination treatment did not progress to metastasis.

Early results of the study comparing surgery to pre- and post-surgical...

Rodabe Amaria, M.D., assistant professor of Melanoma Medical Onoclogy

BY Ron Gilmore

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), a highly aggressive, relapse-prone disease that accounts for one-fourth of all breast cancers, could...

BY Lany Kimmons

In an analysis of more than 120,000 women diagnosed with and treated for early-stage breast cancer, researchers from MD Anderson Cancer...