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BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Increasing the dosage of a prescription smoking cessation medication by 1 milligram a day – from 2 to 3 milligrams – more than doubled abstinence rates after three months in some patients, according to research from MD Anderson Cancer Center.

The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, found that this relatively small increase in varenicline benefited patients taking who had managed to cut down on smoking...

fresh air related to tobacco cessation

BY Joe Munch

Chemotherapy is a proven and effective method for treating many types of cancer, but up to 90% of patients who receive the treatment develop...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Older patients with non-metastatic breast cancer who have been treated modern chemotherapy drugs have a greater risk of secondary acute myeloid...

BY Sarah Bronson

Until recently, patients with esophageal cancer were treated with esophagectomy, or removal of the affected part of the esophagus and surrounding lymph nodes, followed by reconstruction. Barrett esophagus with high-grade dysplasia, which carries a substantial risk of progressing to cancer, was treated the same way. However, esophagectomy leads to significant lifestyle changes, including diet limitations and an inability to sleep horizontally...

esophageal cancer

BY Ron Gilmore

A new genetic-based model developed by an MD Anderson research team may explain how a common form of early-stage breast cancer known as ductal...