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BY Ronda Wendler

Ampullary cancer is a rare type of gastrointestinal cancer with symptoms so similar to pancreatic cancer that it is sometimes mistaken for the disease. The definitive way to confirm an ampullary cancer diagnosis is by removing a tissue sample from the tumor, then analyzing it in the lab.

To learn more about this uncommon disease that accounts for only 1% of all gastrointestinal cancers, we spoke with Michael Overman, M.D.,...

medical illustration of the human digestive system, including the small and large colon, stomach, pancreas and liver

BY Molly Adams

When you hear the word “polyp,” you may think of the colon. But that’s not the only place in your body where they can develop. In fact, you...

BY Gina Van Thomme

When Daniel ‘Joe’ Einspahr, M.D., and his son bike into Virginia Beach next summer, they will have more than one reason to celebrate. Not...

BY Cynthia DeMarco

Adenocarcinomas can develop in many different parts of the body, including the lungs, prostate, colon, rectum, small bowel, pancreas, stomach, esophagus, uterus, parotid gland, cervix (very rarely) and even the appendix.

But what qualities define them as adenocarcinomas? And are there any symptoms or other features that are common to all adenocarcinomas?

We checked in with Jaffer Ajani, M.D., a medical oncologist who specializes...

Illustration of adenocarcinoma in the colon

BY Danielle Underferth

Most stomach cancers are caused by bacteria called helicobacter pylori or H. pylori. Having H. pylori doesn’t mean you’ll get stomach...

BY Cynthia DeMarco

Hand-foot syndrome (also called palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia) is a side effect of some chemotherapy drugs that can cause redness, swelling...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Stomach and esophageal cancers are diagnosed in more than 40,000 people each year in the U.S. Most of these cases aren’t detected until the...

BY Emily Aldrich

When I learned six years ago that I carry a genetic mutation called CDH1, my initial response was anger. I had just gotten married, and my...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

In cancer, there are often large-scale deletions, rearrangements or other disruptions to our genetic information, which lead to a phenomenon...

BY Emily Aldrich

In 2014, I learned that I carry a genetic mutation called CDH1, which markedly increases my risk of developing breast and stomach cancers....