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BY Kellie Bramlet Blackburn

Living with a tracheostomy and learning proper tracheostomy care can take some adjustment for cancer patients who rely on them during cancer treatment. It may even be a little intimidating at first. But patients can lead healthier lives by taking the necessary steps to prepare for a tracheostomy procedure and care for a tracheostomy, also called a trach. 

We spoke with Kate Schwarzlose, an advanced practice registered nurse...

BY Ann Gillenwater, M.D.

As director of MD Anderson’s Oral Cancer Prevention Clinic, I see many patients each year with both oral cancers and pre-cancerous conditions...

BY Shelley Varnado

In January 2020, I noticed a changing spot under my tongue. My family doctor advised that I get it biopsied. The results came back negative...

BY Kate Hutcheson, Ph.D.

The ability to swallow — or to eat and drink what you enjoy most without choking or coughing — is something that many of us take for granted. And most people never think about how they eat or drink until they experience dysphagia, or trouble swallowing. 

Cancers in the mouth, throat or esophagus can make it difficult to swallow. If the ability to swallow is compromised because of a cancer diagnosis or its treatment, it can...

Woman drinking from a glass of water

BY Cynthia DeMarco

Singer and songwriter Kimmie Rhodes holds a somewhat unique distinction: she’s supported two different people on their oral cancer journeys...

BY Cynthia DeMarco

When Cora “Corky” Hilliard was diagnosed with squamous cell cancer of the tongue for the second time in June 2012, she got to MD Anderson...

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

The single greatest step you can take to protecting your health is to quit using tobacco. Tobacco is responsible for one-third of all cancers...

BY Emily Tickle Thomas

My name is Emily Tickle Thomas and I had cancer. I was diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma in 2007 while pregnant with my fourth son...