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BY Devon Carter

When cancer cells enter the leptomeninges, which are part of the membrane that covers the brain and spinal cord, it can turn into a type of metastasis known as leptomeningeal disease (LMD).

“I describe it as a snow globe. Cancer cells can float around and can form new colonies throughout the leptomeninges of the brain and spine,” says Isabella Glitza Oliva, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Melanoma Leptomeningeal Disease Program at...

Brain scan showing leptomeningeal disease

BY Clayton Boldt, Ph.D.

Ginger Head was 56 years old and healthy when she was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer in 2017. She was floored. The retired...

BY MD Anderson Staff

In May 2016, Victor Barreiro learned his melanoma, originally treated in his hometown of Mexico City in 2014, had returned and spread throughout...

BY MD Anderson staff

After doctors successfully removed a melanoma from J.P. Rodriguez’s back in 2006, he resumed his life – working, spending time with family and not thinking much about the disease.

But in 2008, J.P. began to experience headaches, weakness and even a blackout.

Doctors couldn’t figure out the problem until J.P.’s wife mentioned his cancer history during an ER visit. Knowing melanoma can spread, the doctor ordered an MRI. It...

Cancerwise blog post: Melanoma survivor undergoes brain tumor treatment four times to treat metastases

BY Meagan Raeke

A brain tumor diagnosis and treatment can bring many questions. That’s why John de Groot, M.D., co-leader of our Glioblastoma Moon Shot™,...

BY Meagan Raeke

By the time Jennifer Weihe decided to try laser interstitial thermal therapy, or LITT, with neurosurgeon Ganesh Rao, M.D., she’d already been...

BY Barbara O’Brien, M.D.

Coping with a brain tumor can be difficult. Brain tumor symptoms and side effects from treatment can include headaches, seizures, and changes...

BY Lany Kimmons

In the summer of 2012, doctors removed a mole from Vince Leseney’s shoulder. After a biopsy, the musical theater voice instructor and actor...

BY Cherie Rood

My 20-year-old son Charles (Trey) Rood III is a junior at the University of Georgia. He was diagnosed with stage III melanoma when he was...