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Equipment

Bruker 300 MHz DPX NMR Spectrometer

  • Actively shielded magnet
  • Z-axis pulsed field gradient capability
  • A 5 mm broad band observe probe (BBO) for observing nearly all magnetic nuclei
  • A custom built "quad" probe for observing 1H, 13C, 19F, and 195Pt. Changing nuclei is done under software control, as opposed to manually adjusting the probe
  • A Hewlett Packard XW4200 Linux workstation housing Bruker's Topspin software for instrument control
  • A Case 24 autosampler for automated analysis of up to 24 samples. This feature can be used on either spectrometer

Bruker 500 MHz DRX NMR Spectrometer

  • Actively shielded magnet
  • X, Y, and Z Triple-axis pulsed field gradient capability
  • Five probes:
    • A 2.5-mm broad band observe probe for microsamples
    • A 5-mm broad band observe probe
    • A 5-mm broad band inverse detected probe
    • A 5-mm triple resonance probe for observing 1H, 13C, and 15N in biological samples
    • A 5-mm triple resonance probe for observing 1H, 13C, and 31P in biological samples
  • A Hewlett Packard XW4200 Linux workstation housing Bruker's Topspin software for instrument control
  • Variable temperature control

High-Field Instruments

For structural biology problems, higher-field instruments (600 MHz, 750 MHz and 800 MHz) are available through our participation in the Gulf Coast Consortia. Contact Dr. Kaluarachchi for details.

Unix and Linux Workstations

The NMR facility has a Silicon Graphics, Inc., O2 workstation that houses both Bruker NMR software and the program Felix from Accelrys for off-line spectra processing. In addition, we have the InsightII suite of molecular modeling programs from Accelrys for use in structure calculations and other activities such as drug/ligand docking and structure searching with Ludi and MCSS. These programs can be installed on remote SGI or Linux workstations and can be run on the license housed in the NMR lab. In addition to the InsightII programs, we have Amber v8.0 for use in structure calculations and docking experiments.


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