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Prostate Cancer Survivorship


     Transcripts: Español

Course Overview

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. The National Cancer Institute estimated that more than 241,000 men would be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2012. Prostate cancer survivors face chronic health problems that can include neuropathy, impotence, urinary incontinence, and osteoporosis. The cancer experts from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center would like to partner with you to address the full range of challenges associated with the disease and its treatments. The goal of the Prostate Cancer Survivorship course is to provide an overview of prostate cancer: its epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, and symptom screening techniques for early prostate cancer detection; diagnosis and staging; surgery, chemotherapy, hormone, and radiation therapies; late effects of treatment; and survivorship management.


     Course Overview: Español

Support for this course was provided by a generous grant from the Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) PP100157

Lectures

William Osai, MSN, RN, APN, FNP
Overview of Prostate Cancer, Part 1   Top of Page
 
Presenter: William Osai, MSN, RN, APN, FNP
Advanced Practice Nurse
Genitourinary Medical Oncology
 

Summary:Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. William Osai, an advanced practice nurse in the Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, says, "Prostate cancer screening should be individualized based on the patient's risk factors and life expectancy." In his lecture "Prostate Cancer Survivorship: Overview, Part 1," Mr. Osai explains the epidemiology and etiology of prostate cancer. He reviews evidence that suggests modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer. He also differentiates between prostate cancer screening and early detection, discusses the role of prostate-specific antigens in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, and introduces emerging prostate cancer markers.

     Summary and Learning Objectives: Español

William Osai, MSN, RN, APN, FNP
Overview of Prostate Cancer, Part 2   Top of Page
 
Presenter: William Osai, MSN, RN, APN, FNP
Advanced Practice Nurse
Genitourinary Medical Oncology
 

Summary: About 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society. William Osai, an advanced practice nurse in the Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, says most patients diagnosed with prostate cancer do not show symptoms. In his lecture "Prostate Cancer Survivorship: Overview, Part 2," Mr. Osai discusses the initial examination of a patient thought to have prostate cancer, identifies symptoms that can occur with prostate cancer, and describes the processes involved in diagnosing, staging, and treating prostate cancer based on risk stratifications.

     Summary and Learning Objectives: Español

John W. Davis, M.D.
Surgical Management of Prostate Cancer and Late Effects of Surgery   Top of Page
 
Presenter: John W. Davis, M.D.
Associate Professor
Director, Urology Prostate Program
Department of Urology
 

Summary: At The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, robotics plays a key role in the surgical treatment of prostate cancer. Dr. John W. Davis, Associate Professor in the Department of Urology and Director of the Urology Prostate Program at MD Anderson, says that robotic prostatectomy lowers the risk for complications and decreases the duration of patients' hospital stay. In his lecture "Prostate Cancer Survivorship: Surgical Management of Prostate Cancer and Late Effects of Surgery," Dr. Davis reviews a recent 3-year study of robotic prostatectomies performed at MD Anderson. He compares the cost and training associated with robotic prostatectomy with that associated with open prostatectomy. Dr. Davis also compares outcomes, including quality-of-life measures, according to surgical technique.

     Summary and Learning Objectives: Español

 

Farshid Dayyani, M.D., Ph.D.
Role of Chemotherapy and Androgen-deprivation Therapy, Parts 1 & 2   Top of Page
 
Presenter: Farshid Dayyani, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Genitourinary Medical Oncology
 

Summary: Dr. Farshid Dayyani, Assistant Professor in the Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, says, "Chemotherapy is currently not recommended as a standard of care for early-stage prostate cancer outside of clinical trials." In his lecture "Prostate Cancer Survivorship: Role of Chemotherapy and Androgen-deprivation Therapy, Part 1," Dr. Dayyani discusses why chemotherapy is not recommended for early-stage prostate cancer. He shows why androgen-deprivation therapy is the most highly recommended therapy for metastatic prostate cancer and gives advice on managing short-term and long-term effects of androgen-deprivation therapy.

"Although not life-threatening, some of the side effects of androgen-deprivation therapy might severely impact the quality of life of the patients," says Dr. Dayyani. Side effects of androgen-deprivation therapy can include bone fractures, muscle loss, and erectile dysfunction. In his lecture "Prostate Cancer Survivorship: Role of Chemotherapy and Androgen-deprivation Therapy, Part 2," Dr. Dayyani gives advice on identifying some of these side effects, suggests medications that may help, and identifies lifestyle changes that can improve the patient's quality of life.

     Summary and Learning Objectives: Español 1 & 2

 

Karen Hoffman, M.D.
Role of Radiation Therapy   Top of Page
 
Presenter: Karen Hoffman, M.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Radiation Oncology
 

Summary: Most men with prostate cancer have multiple treatment options. Dr. Karen Hoffman, Assistant Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, says, "Treatment is selected based on patient preference after considering potential short- and long-term side effects of treatment, the impact on quality of life, and time away from work for treatment." In her lecture "Prostate Cancer Survivorship: Role of Radiation Therapy," Dr. Hoffman focuses on external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. She describes the processes involved in the two techniques and the role and benefits each has in the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

     Summary and Learning Objectives: Español

 

Karen Hoffman, M.D.
Late Effects of Radiation Therapy and Surveillance After Treatment   Top of Page
 
Presenter: Karen Hoffman, M.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Radiation Oncology
 

Summary: Side effects of radiation therapy for prostate cancer can include fatigue, urinary frequency, and diarrhea. Dr. Karen Hoffman, Assistant Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, says late effects like rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction can develop months or years after the completion of treatment. In her lecture "Prostate Cancer Survivorship: Late Effects of Radiation Therapy and Surveillance After Treatment," Dr. Hoffman identifies common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and describes factors that can contribute to the development of more severe late effects. She gives recommendations for managing patient surveillance after treatment.

     Summary and Learning Objectives: Español

 

Jeri Kim, M.D.
Active Surveillance   Top of Page
 
Presenter: Jeri Kim, M.D.
Associate Professor
GU Medical Oncology
 

Summary: The United States Preventive Services Task Force's recommendation to forgo routine screening for prostate cancer has garnered much controversy. Dr. Jeri Kim, Associate Professor in the Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, says this recommendation "has brought forward the problems with over-diagnosis and over-treatment and their harms." In her lecture "Prostate Cancer Survivorship: Active Surveillance," Dr. Kim stresses the importance and clinical benefit of active surveillance as initial management of early-stage prostate cancer and discusses the risks involved with delayed intervention.

     Summary and Learning Objectives: Español

 

Therese B. Bevers, M.D.
Second Primary Cancers   Top of Page
 
Presenter: Therese B. Bevers, M.D.
Professor, Clinical Cancer Prevention
Medical Director, Cancer Prevention Center
 

Summary: "Specifically, men younger than 50 years who are diagnosed with prostate cancer actually have a 30% increased risk of second primary cancers," says Therese Bevers, Professor of Clinical Cancer Prevention and Medical Director of The Cancer Prevention Center at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. In her lecture "Prostate Cancer Survivorship: Second Primary Cancers," Dr. Bevers outlines the risks and mechanisms related to the development of second primary cancers. She explores ways to modify these risks and discusses how to implement appropriate screening to detect second primary cancers early.

     Summary and Learning Objectives: Español

 

 

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