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Pain Management Skills for Minority Cancer Patients

Principal Investigator: Charles S. Cleeland, Ph.D.

The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of a pain management educational intervention developed for African American and Hispanic patients who are experiencing pain due to cancer. Our previous research results have demonstrated that minority cancer patients are at risk for inadequate pain management. The primary hypothesis of this study is that patients who receive culturally appropriate educational materials on pain management will demonstrate greater pain reduction when compared with a group receiving pain treatment without education on pain management.

Specific Goals

  • To determine if patient education on pain management improves cancer pain control in patients with recurrent or metastatic cancer (Complete)
  • To determine if patient education on pain management reduces the impact of pain on daily life in patients with recurrent or metastatic cancer (Complete)
  • To determine if patient education on pain management improves quality of life and functional status in patients with recurrent or metastatic cancer (Complete)

Methods

Materials

Two sets of videotapes and booklets on cancer pain management were developed for African American and Hispanic cancer patients. The study is a multi-site randomized clinical trial designed to assess the effectiveness of these educational materials.

Design

Patients who are eligible for the study and agree to participate are randomly assigned to either pain management education or an educational control condition. All patients are followed for four assessment periods.

Measures

The outcome measures include the Brief Pain Inventory, SF-12 Health Survey, a measure of perceived pain control and a physician pain assessment form.

For more information

Contact Karen O. Anderson, Ph.D., at koanderso@mdanderson.org


© 2014 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center