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Owl Monkey Breeding and Research Resource

The OMBRR is a component of the Keeling Center’s Neotropical Primate Breeding and Research Resource (NPBRR). This resource helps meet the needs of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ (NIAID) intramural malaria research program and serves the extramural research community by providing owl monkeys of known genetic background, tissues, cell lines and biological fluids from owl monkeys, and a registry of normal values and reagents that can be used in studies that utilize owl monkeys. This is the only such resource for owl monkeys available to the NIH extramural grantee community and has expanded the mission of the NPBRR to a second New World monkey genus.


The longer term goal, to create a self-sustaining breeding resource of owl monkeys, is being accomplished by applying expertise that has been developed at the NPBRR for owl monkeys with resource-related research that specifically focuses on reducing adult mortality and improving reproductive efficiency of the owl monkey. This project is helping address the need for resources of alternative primate species to reduce the demand for rhesus monkeys, which are in critically short supply.


The OBMRR meets the needs of the biomedical research community in three ways:

  • It provides a national resource for laboratory-born owl monkeys. The use of purpose bred animals of known origin reduces the number of animals needed and provides better research animals for investigators. The resource provides tissues and biological fluids to investigators throughout the country, thus reducing the need for living animals for these studies. Use our web request page or download our biologics/animal request form to get information on the availability of animals and tissues.
  • It has an active research component that continues to add new information about the biology of the owl monkey, with a particular emphasis on reproduction and colony management. The bibliography page provides references from a few of the pages published from our laboratory.
  • The resource is a source of expertise for owl monkey biology, management and husbandry that can be accessed by anyone anytime.

© 2014 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center