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Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology

The Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology (CSCDB) provides a platform for interactions between researchers interested in the biology of normal and aberrant (cancer) stem cells, regeneration and differentiation. The members of the center take diverse approaches toward a thorough understanding of stem cells, with an ultimate goal of therapeutic attack on cancers. These efforts are not limited to the 40-plus laboratories across 15 different departments of the UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, but are being coordinated across the Texas Medical Center to include researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the Institute for Molecular Medicine, as a HouSTEM community.

How You Can Support the Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology

The Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology has three major goals: to understand how tumor-derived stem cells become aggressive cancers, to develop stem cells for use in regenerative therapies, and to determine basic mechanisms of differentiation and development.

Further research is needed to achieve these important goals. If you would like to support this research by a donation to our Center and the MD Anderson Cancer Center, please use the web-link below to do so:

Making a Donation: Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology

 

Highlights

  • Human embryonic stem cells labeled with fluorescent proteins.

    Human embryonic stem cells labeled with fluorescent proteins that localize to the nucleus and cell membrane. [Behringer]

  • Human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    Human embryonic stem cell colonies. These unique cells have the ability to form all cell types of the body, providing a unique source of cells for translantation therapy for disease, including cancer. [Behringer]

  • Adult mouse brain showing double cortin-expressing neuroblasts migrating from the subventricular zone to the olfactory bulbs.

    Adult mouse brain showing double cortin-expressing neuroblasts (green) migrating from the subventricular zone to the olfactory bulbs. They are interspersed with GFAP-expressing astrocytes (red). [McCarty]

  • Embryonic mouse brain showing nestin-expressing neural progenitors.

    Embryonic mouse brain (E12.5) showing nestin-expressing neural progenitors (green) intermingled with fibronectin-positive cerebral blood vessels (red). [McCarty]

  • The incorporation of GFP pos human stem cells in a mouse 4T1 tumor vessel.

    The incorporation of GFP pos human stem cells in a mouse 4T1 tumor vessel. [Alt]

  • Freshly isolated stem cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Freshly isolated stem cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue, showing rapid adhesion by membrane filaments and the growth of intercellular microchannels or nanotubes. [Alt]

CSCDB Co-directors

Richard E. Champlin, M.D.

Chair, Dept. of Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

1515 Holcombe Boulevard
Unit 423
Houston, TX 77030
Room Number: FC5.3042
Phone: 713-792-3618
Email: rchampli@mdanderson.org

Michelle C. Barton, Ph.D.

Professor, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

1515 Holcombe Boulevard
Unit 1000
Houston, TX 77030
Room Number: S9.8116B
Phone: 713-834-6268
Email: mbarton@mdanderson.org

Sendurai A. Mani, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Dept. of Translational Molecular Pathology
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

2130 West Holcombe Boulevard
Unit 951
Houston, TX 77030
Room Number: LSP9.2001
Phone: 713-792-9638
Email: smani@mdanderson.org


© 2014 The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center